Saturday, February 2, 2013

Do What You Can Do

Image Courtesy of [graur codrin]/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Foggy brain go away.  Don't come back another day -- I wish!  But here it is,  you are going to get the "Do what you can do, and don't worry about the rest talk."  That is what I plan to do;  because, if I start stressing over brain fog, it will get worse.


  • Earlier today, I started an excellent post by accident as I was commenting on another blog.  I copied it, and redid the blog post comment.  Lesson learned:  immediately copy to stick it note or new template, because I might delete the really good stuff, while I copy a name so I won't forget to spell it properly.  If that post makes sense to me tomorrow and my fog will let me edit without feeling brain dead, it will be in Living Better With An Invisible Illness.
  • I can do a load of laundry and put away the basket that has been sitting there a week.
  • I can do the FlyLady habit for the month, which is to declutter for 15 minutes every day.
  • I can write down a couple of things I need to do, and when I finish I can check them off my list.
  • Also, I can continue to get dressed daily, which I had let up on because I have been fighting depression.  This is something I have already accomplished --  Hooray, me!
  • What can you do?  Your list doesn't have to be as long as mine.
You and I can do this.  I know we can.  Take Baby Steps back when flare-ups, depression, or brain fog hits -- that is the way to go.  Be grateful for what we can do.  Enjoy doing something that doesn't make the brain fog worse.  You will have to decide what works for you.  I like to read something entertaining or watch a funny movie.  Sometimes, I work on my art journal.  Or I take a short walk with the dog.  Or I take my anti-anxiety medicine, and I go lie down in my quiet bedroom if there is too much coming into the brain and my nerves are on end.  If you have Fibromyalgia, you probably know exactly what I am talking about.  Sometimes, it is a daily battle and sometimes, we seem to have moments of respite.  Never again do I want this disease to flood my life with guilt over the things I cannot do all the time.  How about you?

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It's always lovely hearing from you. xoxo, Deborah